10 of the Best Survey Email Examples To Learn From


The success of your entire business depends on your ability to keep your customers happy. Given that reality, it goes without saying that you need a way to keep up with your customers’ attitudes toward your business. Unhappy customers mean less revenue, so you want to catch any dissatisfaction in time to fix the issues causing it.

So, the question is, how do you do that? Well, the best solution is to send out customer surveys via email. In those surveys, you can ask customers for their feedback directly.

On this page, we’ll be looking at 10 survey email examples to help you get a sense for how your own emails should be structured. Those emails come from the following companies:

  1. Think with Google
  2. Eton
  3. Simple
  4. Taylor Stitch
  5. Skillshare
  6. Mailchimp
  7. HermanMiller
  8. MacPaw
  9. Seeso
  10. Hers

Keep reading to see each of these examples of survey emails. Then, speaking of emails, you can subscribe to our email newsletter — Revenue Weekly — to get even more marketing tips sent straight to your inbox!

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1. Think with Google

The first example survey email on our list comes from Think with Google. 

This email uses a very simple, straightforward layout. The most important part of the email is the call to action (CTA) button near the bottom, which everything else is built around. The use of white space draws the user’s eye straight to it.

If users have to follow a link to access your survey, this is the way to go. You want it to be very clear what they should click and where it will take them.

2. Eton

Eton’s survey email example is like Google’s in the sense that it’s built around a single CTA button. However, there are a couple of notable distinctions. 

First, it gives a bit more information about the survey and what it’s for. And second, you’ll notice that the email conveys a very elegant sort of look, which communicates Eton’s branding.

That’s the main takeaway here: Your survey emails (like all your digital marketing efforts) should communicate your brand. If your brand is built on professionalism, send out a classy survey email. But if your brand is fun and whimsical, find ways to make your emails entertaining.

3. Simple

This example survey email from Simple certainly lives up to the brand’s name. It would be hard to make this email any simpler — it consists solely of a question and a number scale you can click to give your answer. No filler text, no images, no CTAs — just a question and answer. That’s it.

This is perfect for simple surveys where you really want to maximize the number of responses you get. This email wastes no time getting to the survey, and it doesn’t even require users to follow a link to a webpage to answer it — they can just do it right there in the email.

4. Taylor Stitch

Whereas Simple’s survey consisted of only one question, Taylor Stitch offers a longer survey. Users might not be as interested in answering more questions, but Taylor Stitch tries to make it as easy on them as possible.

To start, it does the same thing Simple does — including the survey right in the email instead of making users follow a link to another page. It also keeps everything as clean and simple as possible so users won’t feel overwhelmed. Several of the questions are multiple-choice, which is also a great idea.

5. Skillshare

Another of the best examples of survey emails comes from Skillshare. Here we have yet another example of a survey that’s embedded in the email itself. However, this one takes it a step further, making the survey questions visually appealing with artwork created for each one.

Also, the questions in this survey aren’t aimed at getting recipients to review Skillshare’s services. Instead, they’re intended to help enhance users’ experience on Skillshare’s site. That makes customers feel cared for and invested in, which probably leads a lot of them to engage more with Skillshare.

6. Mailchimp

The standout feature of this Mailchimp survey email example is the fact that it imposes a deadline. At first glance, it might seem like a deadline would limit the number of responses you get. But telling users that they have a limited time to do something makes them more likely to do it, because no one likes missing a deadline.

In the case of this email, the headline “It’s your last chance to participate” jolts users into action and encourages them to fill out the survey right then and there. Without a time constraint, many users would just say “I’ll do it later,” and then forget about it. But that doesn’t happen with this email format.

7. HermanMiller

A deadline might be a good incentive to complete a survey, but you know what’s even better? A prize. In this email from HermanMiller, the company offers survey-takers the chance to win one of their products, namely an Eames Hang-It-All.

A lot of people will look at that and think, “A chance to win a product for free just by taking a quick survey? That’s a steal!” That results in a lot of survey responses. If you offer a prize (or even the chance to win one) in your own survey emails, you might see a similar increase in responses.

8. MacPaw

The survey portion of MacPaw’s email isn’t that much different from what we’ve already seen. We get a short blurb followed by a CTA button that leads to the survey. But it’s what comes after that CTA button that helps this email stand out.

MacPaw knows that not everyone will fill out the survey, but they don’t want the email to be a total waste of effort for those people. So, they follow up the survey request with a CTA to shop for their products. Regardless of whether someone takes the survey, at least MacPaw gets another sale out of the email.

9. Seeso

Most of the examples of survey emails we’ve seen on this list so far have been aimed at getting a general sense of customers’ satisfaction levels. But this email from Seeso is a little different. It was sent out in response to a subscription cancellation, and its goal is to figure out why the user cancelled.

This is a great idea for your own business as well if you offer a subscription-based product or service. Knowing why your customers choose to leave tells you what you can do to keep them around in the future. Plus, it serves as an opportunity to encourage them to come back.

10. Hers

The last example survey email on our list comes from Hers. Unlike all the others we’ve seen, this email isn’t aimed at getting users to fill out a survey. Instead, it gets sent out to users who already have taken a survey.

This email doesn’t directly ask users for anything — it simply gives them a graphic showing them the overall results of the survey they answered. That helps users feel heard, plus it gives them a way to compare their own answers to the overall response provided by users who took the survey.

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Get help creating your own survey emails with WebFX

These survey email examples should give you a basis for your own emails. But it can still take a lot of time and effort to create good survey emails, and sometimes it’s best to partner with the professionals. 

WebFX has over 28 years of experience with digital marketing, so we know how to create compelling emails that drive results.

Interested in partnering with us for our email marketing services? Just give us a call at 888-601-5359 or contact us online today to get started!